What You Need to Know About Kitchen Worktops

Kitchen worktops are the cornerstone around which any kitchen design is based. It will affect the kitchen's look and feel as well as the cabinetry. Replacing a kitchen is expensive and one of the key decisions that need to be made early on is the material used for the work surface. In this article I have reviewed 3 kitchen worktops that can be stunning in the right property but are best suited for those with a healthy budget.

Granite Kitchen Worktops

Granite is a well-known premium material for kitchen worktops that remains popular for high end kitchen manufacturers and designers.

Pros

Granite does not deteriorate or depreciate and adds value to your property.
As it is a natural stone each piece is unique and has an almost luminous look.
It's very sanitary, you don't have to worry about bacterial contamination, which is pretty important for a kitchen!
Granite was created under immense heat and pressure so it will not be damaged by a scolding hot pan.
It's easy to clean with warm water and a mild detergent.
Cons

If you are after a uniform look then you need to look elsewhere - each slab is different.
Both the materials and the installation is expensive and because of its considerable weight the cabinets underneath will require additional support.
Sharp objects can crack the surface if it's hit with force.
Once you have chosen granite you have committed. Removing it is difficult and can damage the cabinets.

Marble Kitchen Worktops

This material is becoming more and more popular in both kitchens and bathrooms. It's a beautiful stone with natural patterns that make each piece unique.

Pros

Marble does not go out of fashion, it has a classic, timeless beauty.
It is a very poor conductor of heat and is naturally cool, which has obvious advantages for a kitchen worktop.
Whilst it's not cheap it is widely available and easy to source from any stone mason.
Cons

If you are a clumsy cook then you might want to avoid marble as it can be easily scratched.
Anything acidic such as red wine and fruit juices can also easily stain this stone.

Engineered Stone Kitchen Worktops

This material is most commonly used where robust surfaces are required, which includes bathrooms,
wall paneling and kitchen worktops.

Pros

Because the stone is engineered it can be customized and it readily available in a variety of colors.
It's ideal if you are after a uniform look.
It never needs sealing and it one of the easiest surfaces in terms of maintenance.
This material can be cut thinner than its natural counterparts making it lighter and requiring less cabinet support.
You can create a seamless look by making the sink and other areas from the same material.
Cons

Don't think it's cheap just because it's engineered.
It doesn't have the same natural characteristics as the others which a lot of people prefer aesthetically.
We spend a lot of our time in our kitchens and it's always a key room in any interior design scheme. Money spent on a new kitchen is rarely a waste of money either. Any investment is often recouped in the increased value of the property, especially if the improvement is significant.